June 15, 2024

Salinas Valley Health is one of two hospitals to offer cutting-edge PAD treatment

Medical breakthroughs in the fight against peripheral arterial disease have been made, and the Salinas hospital is one of the first places to implement the new procedure. Peripheral arterial disease affects more than 20 million Americans and is particularly prevalent in Monterey County. The disease occurs when plaque builds up in the arteries within the arms and legs. Risk factors for PAD include: Smoking History of heart disease High blood pressure High cholesterol Diabetes Age Seventy-four years old Javier Lopez was one of the first patients to undergo the groundbreaking procedure. called percutaneous transarterial bypass, also known as P-TAB. According to Lopez, the clogged arteries in his legs were so painful that he could no longer work and could barely walk. vein to restore blood flow. The stent is made of a special material that reacts to the body’s heat, expanding and applying constant pressure to keep the vein open. The procedure takes about 90 minutes, with most patients going home the same day. In the past, Lopez’s condition would have required invasive bypass surgery, multiple nights in the hospital, a lot of risk and a recovery time of six to eight weeks. Now, Lopez can walk again. Currently, Salinas Valley Health and the Cleveland Clinic are the only two facilities that offer the procedure, but the primary physician in Lopez’s procedure, Dr. Jim Joye, is in to train doctors across the country. . Joye expects the procedure to be made available on a much wider basis in the near future. “Trust me, this is at the forefront of the spear. This will be a thousand hospitals three years from now.”

Medical advances have been made in the fight against peripheral arterial disease, and the Salinas hospital is one of the first places to implement the new procedure.

Peripheral arterial disease affects more than 20 million Americans and is particularly prevalent in Monterey County. The disease occurs when plaque builds up in the arteries within the arms and legs.

Risk factors for PAD include:

  • Smoking
  • Family history of heart disease
  • High blood pressure
  • high cholesterol
  • Diabetes
  • Age

Seventy-four-year-old Javier Lopez was one of the first patients to undergo the brand new procedure called percutaneous transarterial bypass, also known as P-TAB. According to Lopez, the clogged arteries in his legs were so painful that he could no longer work and could barely walk.

P-TAB is also known as the bypass system because it allows doctors to bypass the artery blocked by plaque with stents placed through the femoral vein to restore blood flow. The stent is made of a special material that reacts to the body’s heat, expanding and applying constant pressure to keep the vein open. The procedure takes about 90 minutes, with most patients going home the same day.

In the past, Lopez’s condition would have required invasive bypass surgery, multiple nights in the hospital, a lot of risk and a recovery time of six to eight weeks. Now, Lopez can walk again.

Currently, Salinas Valley Health and the Cleveland Clinic are the only two facilities that offer the procedure, but the lead physician in Lopez’s procedure, Dr. Jim Joye, is in the process of training doctors across the country. . Joye expects the procedure to be made available on a much wider basis in the near future.

“Trust me, this is cutting edge. This will be a thousand hospitals three years from now.”

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